Ceviche Verde

When in Mexico, ceviche is my favourite dish to eat. It’s fresh, tasty and goes bloody well with an ice cold beer (Indio or Pacifico please!). So here’s a super easy dish you can whip up in no time. It’s a crowd pleaser and the perfect all round summer dish.

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS

1kg fresh white fish fillets diced (I used rockling)
Juice of 8 lemons
5 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon chopped oregano
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 tomato chopped
Tortilla chips to serve

For the dressing:

1 cup coarsely chopped parsley
4 tablespoon coarsely chopped basil
10 green olives, pitted
1 serrano or habanero chilli (if you cannot get either just use a plain green chilli)
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tomato for garnish

thumb_IMG_4656_1024

METHOD

In a container with an airtight lid, add the diced fish, lemon juice, vinegar, bay leaves, oregano, tomato and sea salt. Mix gently, cover and let marinate in the fridge for 30 mins.

Untitled-1

To make the dressing, combine all the ingredients in a blender or food processor and process until well mixed.

Strain the fish from the marinade and add the dressing. Garnish with tomato and serve with tortilla chips.

 DSCF4643

Share

Mexico City from an expat’s perspective

Mexico Australian Expat

Meet Cathy Crossing. She’s an Aussie expat who’s been living in Mexico City for four years. I caught up with her to get her perspective of the place.

OM: What brought you to Mexico?

CC: I had been living in Shanghai China for 4 years and was looking for a new position. I found an advert for a job in Mexico. This was exciting as I had a passion for music from Latin America for many years. Fortunately I got the job – I’m an international teacher. The children are from around the globe so it makes teaching very interesting. Conversations in class discussions can be very international, so I learn a lot about the world from my students.

OM: Most Aussies would have a negative view about Mexico City. Tell us a bit about the city from your perspective.

CC: With the current world in crisis it seems that Mexico suddenly looks very safe. There are of course the usual safety issues for a city of 20+ million people. My first impressions were that the city was more beautiful than expected, the people were very friendly, and often I felt quite safe. People here work very long days so the stereotypical image of a Mexican having long siestas certainly does not apply to the people of this busy city. Mexico City is a very cosmopolitan city with lot’s of tasty food to be eaten at affordable prices, it’s safe to say I’ve never gone hungry here! Mexico makes great coffee also and there are a number of places in the city where you can sample local coffee prepared beautifully. A new favourite cafe is Cardinal in Roma Norte.

OM: What was it like for you when you first moved to Mexico?

CC: Naturally I was worried when I first moved here as I didn’t know the language. I was located to a lovely home close to work, which unfortunately was very far from the city. It was not easy at first learning how to manage taxis in Mexico City as you really needed to give directions to your driver. This was rather difficult for someone who initially didn’t know where they were. This is no longer the case with Uber, so travel has become much easier and safer.

For some reason I was expecting to see more stereotypical Mexicans with moustaches and sombreros. I was also expecting to see more violence and dead people in the street. I am happy to say that it has been a lot better than expected and now I love it here. The only time I really see the big sombreros and moustaches is for national holidays and celebrations. As for violence, I unfortunately have had my experiences, but so far I’ve never seen anyone being shot. Phew!

OM: What’s the hardest thing about living in Mexico?

CC: Language!! You’re not Mexican and will always be a foreigner no matter how many years you live here. So basically when things are bad, they are very very bad. For example, if you have any banking issues of any sort things are much easier if you have a Mexican person doing the talking for you. Even if you speak Spanish fluently, your accent will always be noted as ‘not local’.

OM:  And what is the easiest thing about living in Mexico?

CC: Travel. If you wish to visit places on the weekend the bus system here has to be one of the best in the world. The seats are spacious and comfortable for people with long legs. You can take a bus to most places in the country, so this is not a stress.

OM: If someone has 24 hours in Mexico City what should their itinerary look like?

CC: Turibus. This is usually the first thing that is recommended to tourists. It is a hop on hop off system for 1 day, so you can get to most of the cities famous places without the hassle of navigating a big city on your own, and you can get off and explore as you like. The bus has an open roof so on a good day (which is most days) you can see loads from the bus. It really is fabulous.

OM: What is your favourite destination in Mexico?

CC: Las Posas in Xilitla. This is an incredible place to visit. I loved how Edward James created a fantasy land with surrealist sculptures and architecture in this beautiful park. At times it was like a Lord of the Rings setting as you walked through the ‘bush’ and then suddenly found what looked like an ancient temple.

12282910_10153199650304249_400120606_n copy

Share

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)

Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead festival, is celebrated all over Mexico and can be traced back to the Aztecs. It’s a celebration of death and runs from 1-2 of November. Over these days, and all through the week leading up to it, there are street stalls, bands, dances, people dressed in macabre costumes and flowers galore.

day of the dead

After the Spanish invaded, the celebration was merged with catholic theology but the theory goes that during the day of November 1st all of the dead children are allowed out of heaven and can return to spend time with their family. On November 2nd the dead adults return to do the same. Families set up altars with copious amounts of drinks and sweets to ensure that the returning family members enjoy their day back. They return to the grave sites to celebrate and be merry with their loved ones.

day of the dead

Although it sounds a little macabre, it’s actually quite a joyus and festive occasion and it’s one of the best times to visit Mexico.

SHOP DAY OF THE DEAD SKULLS

Share

See Puerto Escondido

ABOUT

Puerto Escondido literally means ‘hidden port’ in Spanish and is situated on the Pacific Coast side of Mexico in the state of Oaxaca. There’s no international airport here which means the place has escaped mass development and retains its sleepy seaside town feel. It’s a favourite amongst locals, surfers and tourists seeking something more than the packaged Cancun experience.

Playa Carizalillo, puerto escondido

GETTING THERE

As I mentioned before, Puerto Escondido does not have an International airport, only a domestic airport. So the easiest and quickest way to get there is by plane from Mexico City with Aeromexico or Viva Aerobus, or you can opt to take the scenic route via a 6 hour bus ride.

STAY

Stay off the main drag at a cute little B&B called Quinta Lili and you won’t be disappointed. Housing five guest rooms (one with a balcony spa) this place is like staying at a friends house. It’s only a five minute walk to the best beach in Puerto Escondido, Playa Carrizalillo, and you’ll get a tasty mexican brekkie served up at the outdoor bar every morning, along with friendly conversation and tips from owner Adelina.

Quinta Lili

Quinta Lili

Quinta Lili

Quinta Lili

GETTING AROUND

Taxis can be hailed off the street and cost between 20-25 pesos. If you’re staying off the main drag near Playa Carrizalillo, you may need to ask your hotel to call you a cab or take a walk up to the Benito Juarez strip and flag one down from there.

DO

PLAYA CARRIZALILLO 
Situated at the bottom of a cliff (a spectacular view from the top) this beach has smaller waves and scattered day beds with small vendors along the sand. Hire a daybed, sip on a cocktail and soak up the atmosphere. Down side, you’ll want another cocktail after climbing the stairs out of there!

Playa Carizalillo, puerto escondido

Playa Carizalillo, puerto escondido

OMAR’S SPORTSFISHING AND DOLPHIN WATCHING
These guys offer more than just a fishing trip. When I took a tour with them last year, I saw turtles mating, a whale, and at least 100 dolphins swimming beside the boat. We also caught an amazing sail fish that we returned to the waters.

Omar's Sport Fishing

Omar's Sport Fishing

 

 

Omar's Sport Fishing

RELEASE BABY TURTLES AT SUNSET
Quinta Lili can help you to organise this. At Palmarito beach you’ll meet with a local conservationist who will explain how they collect turtle eggs every night (between November and May), patrolling the beach on a four wheeler motorbike to ensure they are not taken by wayward locals or other predators. Locals have been known take the eggs because they believe by eating them that they will last as long in the sack as a turtle does… which is apparently quite a while. The conservationists bury the eggs in protected nests until the lil’ tortugas hatch and make their way to the top. They are volunteers and receive no government support so, for a donation to their cause, you can assist them in releasing the little ones.

Releasing baby turtles, Mexico

Releasing baby turtles, Mexico

Releasing baby turtles, Mexico

PLAYA ZICATELA
Head down to one of the many beachside bars and watch surfers tackle the monster waves at Playa Zicatela, better still attempt some yourself if you’re game!

EAT

TURTLE BAY CAFE
Close to Quinta Lili on Benito Juarez sits this quaint little family cafe. They serve amazingly satisfying seafood dishes that won’t hit the wallet hard.

Turtle Bay

Turtle bay

EL NENE
Also on Benito Juarez, this is a cute place set in a lush little courtyard with a handful of plastic tables and chairs. The margaritas here are tops and I can also vouch for the garlic fish and cheesy quesadillas. The ambience is also great, with low level lighting, good music and very enthusiastic bar staff.

COSTENITO CEVICHERIA
A rustic bar and restaurant on the main beach, Playa Zicatela, with fantastic ceviche and fresh fish. The cocktails are pretty bloody good also! Go at sunset.

Conozcan a mi COSTEÑITO CEVICHERIA #soycosteñito #costeñitocevicheria #puertoescondido #zicatela

A photo posted by Costeñito Cevicheria (@costenitocevicheria) on

NEED TO KNOW

  • It gets pretty hot here, especially during the dryer months, so be prepared!
  • When booking a trip, keep in mind that Easter time can be a little hectic as lots of locals will visit for the holidays.
  • If you’re staying out of the main drag near Playa Carrizalillo, it’s a good idea to take a bit of cash as ATMs are few and far between.
Share

Delicious Chicken Tinga

Chicken Tinga is a delicious dish made from chipotles, tomato and onion. It goes well on tortillas or tostadas and is sure to be a crowd pleaser at your next fiesta. This dish has relatively easy to get ingredients, but if you’re stuck check out my article on where to get Mexican ingredients in Australia here.

Chicken Tinga

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

STOCK
1/2 onion
2 cloves
500g chicken thigh fillets
4 cloves of garlic
1 bay leaf
1 sprig of thyme
1 sprig of marjoram
sea salt

SALSA
2 dried smoked chipotle chillies
1 dried poblano chilli
4 tablespoons of olive oil
100g chorizo sliced
1 onion sliced
3 cloves of garlic finely chopped
3 large tomatoes
1 1/2 raw sugar
2 bay leaves
2 sprigs of thyme
1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
pinch of ground cloves
1 teaspoon of pepper
sea salt
tortillas to serve

METHOD

Pour 1.5 litres of water into a large saucepan. Stud the onion with the two cloves and add to the pan with the chicken, garlic, bay leaf, thyme, marjoram, and a pinch of salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for 2 hours and then leave to cool in the stock. Once cooled, remove the chicken, shred and set aside.

Meanwhile, line a baking tray with baking paper and place a wire rack on top. Slice the tomatoes in half and sprinkle with thyme, salt and pepper and place on the rack cut side down. Dry roast for 2 hours at 150°C and then peel and grind the tomatoes.

Heat a frypan and dry roast the chillies, then add to a bowl of hot water and let soak for 10 minutes. Place chillies and water in a blender and combine then strain. Set aside the liquid.

Heat the olive oil in a large frypan on a medium heat and add the sliced chorizo. Cook for 10 minutes then reduce to a low heat. Add the onion and garlic and simmer until the onion is translucent. Add the ground tomatoes and sugar and cook for 10 minutes. Stir in the bay leaves, thyme, oregano, cloves, pepper and chilli liquid.  Cook until the sauce has thickened, then add the shredded meat and season to taste.

Serve with tortillas, limes, avocado and sour cream.

Share

See Puebla

ABOUT

I’m going to give you a little history lesson. You know the Cinco De Mayo party that most westerners celebrate as Independance Day for Mexico? Well it’s not Mexico’s Independence day (that’s September 16), it’s actually the day of The Great Battle of Puebla where the Mexicans defeated the French. It was also only a temporary victory, as they came back a year later and won the war. Cinco De Mayo is really only celebrated in Mexico in the state of Puebla.

Like many states in Mexico, Puebla is also the name of the state and its capital. The capital is a lovely colonial city about 1.5 hour drive from Mexico City, making it the perfect day trip or weekend getaway.

Puebla

GETTING THERE

The easiest way to get to Puebla is by car or bus from Mexico City. Buses leave regularly from the TAPO & Aeropuerto stations with Estrella Roja, ADO and Pullman and tickets cost around 160-200 pesos depending on the class level of the bus you take.

STAY

Stay in the historical centre at Mesones Sacristía. It’s a quirky hotel with the an intense, bright pink interior and unusual pieces of art and antiques scattered around the place. Each of the 8 rooms are decorated with their own theme,  I stayed in the “European Suit” when I was there. It had a massive wooden medieval door that required a mammoth iron key to open, was painted purple and decorated with all sorts of interesting art.

Mesones Sacristía

Mesones Sacristía

Mesones Sacristía

Mesones Sacristía

GETTING AROUND

Getting a registered taxi from the bus station will cost you about 60 pesos. In town they are cheaper off the street and will cost between 20 and 30 pesos. Once you’re in the centro historico area though you won’t need a taxi, you’ll just need a some good walking shoes and a map.

DO

WANDER
If you’re in Puebla for the weekend, you’re in for a treat. The centre is bustling with artisanal and antique markets and the weather is almost always sunny and 20! Soak up the atmosphere, say hola to the friendly locals and stop at the many hole in the wall bars.

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

Puebla

TALAVERA FACTORY

Talavera pottery is a maiolica style of pottery unique to Puebla. There are english speaking staff members at this factory, and if you ask they will take you on a tour to show how their amazing pottery is made. This stuff is proper handmade; from the mixing of the stones and the colours, to the making of the clay to the hand moulding and painting of the products. They only do a few designs and only use colours that come from certain natural stones and metals (a mix of about six colours). This stuff is the real deal and isn’t cheap, be careful of cheaper and inferior versions (that contain led) that you’ll see around Mexico and in Australia. If it’s too good to be true it usually is.

Talavera

Talavera

Talavera

Talavera

EAT MEXICO

Eat Mexico do food tours in both Mexico City and Puebla. The tours are small, personal and are run by locals who live in the area. Regional cuisine in Mexico is different to any “Mexican” cuisine you’ll get outside of the country so this tour is a great way to learn where the best spots to eat are and to try new things. The tour finishes at a cute little bar called La Pasita where the owner makes his own alcohol called Pasita (a kind of liqueur). He’s been around for years, and you can tell, the bar is full of all sorts of quirky stuff from different eras and he takes his drinks very seriously (one drink has to be eaten with a piece of cheese – NO EXCEPTIONS).

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

Eat Mexico

EAT

MESONES SACRISTIA

The hotel has a cute little restaurant that serves up local cuisine and live music at nights. Their breakfasts are also delicious – i kept going back for the Enchiladas Mole.

Mesones Sacristía

A GO GO BAR
Enter through a courtyard to this trendy place where all the cool kids hang out on a Saturday night.  There’s a DJ playing a daggy mix of 80s, 90s and 00s,  2 for 1 cocktails and friendly staff.

MAIZ PRIETO
From A Go Go Bar, head upstairs to Maiz Prieto. This place is a modern fusion of Mexican and international cuisine and sure to impress the fussiest of eaters. Be sure to start with a mezcal!

Maiz Prieto

Maiz Prieto

Maiz Prieto

Maiz Prieto

NEED TO KNOW

You can get buses to and from Puebla from Mexico City last minute so Puebla is the perfect spontaneous getaway.

Share

Visit Acapulco

ABOUT

Made famous in the 1950s and 60s, my favourite way to describe Acapulco (which I found written on a t-shirt there) is ‘delightfully tacky yet unrefined’. It’s a resort town stuck in time, but that shouldn’t stop you from visiting; with the introduction of Cancun and Puerto Vallarta as new holiday playgrounds for American tourists, Acapulco is a holiday destination for locals and a hell of a lot cheaper.

Acapulco

GETTING THERE

Acapulco is located in the state of Guerrero which has a bad rap for being dangerous, but the tourist zone is actually quite safe and if you fly there you’ll have no issues. From the US Aeromexico and United Airlines offer seasonal flights from various locations. From Mexico City Interjet and Aeromexico offer daily flights and Volaris offer daily flights from Monterrey.

STAY

Head up the hill to Las Brisas (the breezes). It’s out of the tourist zone and has cracking views of the bay. Airbnb list some amazing places there or alternatively we recommend Las Brisas hotel. A lot of their rooms have private swimming pools and the sunsets are to die for!

Las Brisas

GETTING AROUND

Cabs are a dime a dozen in Acapulco with the little old blue Volkswagon Beatles being the cheapest. There are also nicer, newer airconditioned taxis but regardless of which cab you choose, you shouldn’t really pay more than 50 pesos for a local trip.

DO

Hire a driver (your accommodation should be able to help you with this) to take you around town to see our top must sees:

HOTEL LOS FLAMINGOS
This place was once owned by John Wayne and his “Hollywood gang” of friends like Johnny Weissmuller (tarzan), Fred Mc Murray, Rex Allen, Errol Flyn, Red Skelton, Roy Rodgers, Richard Widmark and Cary Grant. Its facade is bright pink and it’s positioned right on the edge of a cliff with uninterrupted views of the Pacific. The restaurant there dishes up great food and the bar is apparently the birthplace of the Coco Loco cocktail. So we recommend you arrive just before sunset, pull up a seat at the bar and order yourself a Coco Loco. If you’re feeling a little nostelgic, the hotel is still in full operation so you can stay there as well.

Hotel Los Flamingos

Hotel Los Flamingos

img_5504

DIEGO RIVERA MURAL
The local story behind this beautiful mural is that apparently womanising Diego was trying to win over the heart of wealthy resident Dolores Olmedo, who at one stage called Rivera a frog. While she was in Mexico City for a break Rivera decided to create a massive, ultra cool mural on her front fence, in the picture you can see a dog which refers to a much loved pet that Olmedo lost and a frog which refers to Rivera (he had a sense of humour). The mural worked and Olmedo agreed to marry Rivera, but she never did because he died soon after. Definitely worth a look.

Diego Rivera

LA QUEBRADA
One of Acapulco’s most famous attractions thanks to Elvis’ movie, Fun in Acapulco, this show has been a tradition since 1934. Performers do a dive at 1pm each day and then three nightly dives with flood lights. These five fellas are bloody nuts. Not only do they dive 25 metres into a narrow opening, but they also free climb up the cliff wearing nothing but a pair of speedos. They all take their dives (one at a time) after building up audience anticipation but not without first kissing a statue of the Virgin of Guadalupe.

La Quebrada

La Quebrada

La Quebrada

CAPILLA DE LA PAZ (CHAPEL OF PEACE)
The Chapel of Peace is located in Las Brisas, right next door to Julio Iglesias’ house. It was built by a family who settled the area back in the 60s when it was just a jungle on a cliff. It was originally a catholic chapel but later on changed to ‘a chapel for all religions’ and was opened up to the public. The same family still tend to it and the view is now rated number 5 in the world on Trip Adviser. Impressive.

Chapel of Peace

Chapel of Peace

Chapel of Peace

EAT

Head down to the main beach with the locals and sample the fresh seafood options at many of the beachside restaurants or simply hire day bed and wait for the the roaming vendors to come to you. They offer everything from freshly shucked oysters to fresh fruit seasoned with chilli and lime as well as ice cream. Oh and have another Coco Loco while you’re there!

Acapulco

Acapulco

Acapulco

NEED TO KNOW

Acapulco has a bad rap for being dangerous and it’s true, the state of Guerrero can be dangerous. But if you exercise normal travel caution and fly into Acapulco, there’s no reason why you wont have a great holiday there.

 

 

Share

Visit Havana, Cuba

ABOUT

Not exactly Mexico, but only a 2 hour flight away, Cuba is definitely worth the visit if you’re in Mexico. Havana, the country’s capital, has been stuck in time since the USA block in 1959 but this may all change soon with the US’s relaxation of restrictions. Visit before it’s too late.

Havana

GETTING THERE

For Aussies, the quickest and most direct way to get to Cuba is via Mexico (preferably whilst visiting Mexico).  Interjet and Aeromexico fly direct daily with Cubana airlines flying there Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Cubana is usually the cheapest, but be warned, they aren’t the best. Expect dodgy toilets, seats that are falling apart and an archaic russian fleet. When we flew them, people even clapped when we landed…..

Arrival into Havana’s airport can be a bit of a shock. The place is kitted out with lovely yellow walls and red trimming and you’ll most likely be questioned by officials before you even make it through immigration. Just take it in your stride.

Taxis from the airport are easy to come by, expect to pay about 20-25 CUC per car. What the CUC is a CUC? Cuba has two currencies, the CUC (Cuban convertible peso – 1 CUC roughly equals 1 USD) which is the tourist currency and the CUP (Cuban Peso) which is for locals. For the locals the CUP is used for all basic necessities and the CUC is for luxury items. The only time a you need CUPs as a tourist is if you want to shop at local markets or buy peso pizza off the street. In our four days there we didn’t need or use any CUPs. You do need to make sure you take some money over with you though as you can’t rely on ATMs working for you. You can’t get CUCs until you are in Cuba so take Mexican pesos as you will get a horrible exchange rate on USD. You can exchange money at the airport and also in town at banks. Don’t exchange too much though as you can’t exchange it back once you’ve left the country.

STAY

Accommodation options range from 5 star, overpriced resorts and hotels (usually government owned) to casas particulares which tend to be more affordable and offer better value. We recommend a cute B&B in the burbs called La Rosa D’Ortega, about 10 minutes out of Havana centro. It’s a beautiful old house in perfect nic and one of the few B&B accommodations to have a pool (perfect after a hot and steamy day exploring Havana). Staff there are very friendly, the rooms roomy and neat plus a decent but simple breakfast is included in the rate (around $80US for a double or $60US for a single). One thing to remember though is that you wont have internet unless you stay at one of the overpriced hotels and even then you’ll have to pay a ridiculous fee to access it. We enjoyed not having internet though, it meant we actually focused on relaxing and enjoying ourselves rather than checking facey.

La Rosa D’Ortega La Rosa D’Ortega

GETTING AROUND

There are two kinds of taxis in Havana. The yellow cabs which cost around 7 CUCs per trip and the old work horses which cost around 10 CUCs per trip. The old cars are fun to cruise around in and they also have the extra seat in the front, perfect if you’re a party of 5 like we were. Hail them off the street and negotiate a price. Keep in mind that these are old cars and the locals work hard to keep them running.

Cars havana

Cars havana

Cars havana

Havana cars

Havana cars

DO

WANDER THE HISTORICAL CENTRE
Old Havana is the original city of Havana. Many of the buildings here had fallen into ruin in the latter half of the 20th century, but in recent times the government has invested money from tourism into restoring the area. It’s a pretty place to explore.

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

Havana Old Town

PLAYA JIBACOA
A favourite amongst the locals, this beach is less touristy, the water blue and clear, and when we were there, we were entertained by an awesome crab. What more could you want?

Playa Jibacoa

Playa Jibacoa

Playa Jibacoa

FABRICA DE ARTE CUBANO
Fabrica de Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory) is the place where all the cool hipster kids and artists hang. It’s a night club and art space housed in an old oil factory and we thought it was pretty awesome. After lining up for about 30 minutes we were given entry with a “ration card” which was used to record all the drinks we had (we were to pay at the end). We wandered from room to room listening to live music, admiring art and jewelery and then ended up at a space at the end of the building. As we were sipping our cocktails and chatting the lights dimmed and we found ourselves in the middle of an art performance inspired by Pink Floyd. Men in silver paint and hard hats moved giant bricks around, invading personal space and creating a sense of drama.

EAT

While Cuba isn’t exactly known for it’s food, there are still some gems to be found. A Paladar (home restaurant where all the best food is) is your best bet. We asked a cycle taxi to take us to their favourite place. We were taken down a few side streets and ended up at a small home with about five tables. We feasted on lobster, beans and rice for about 12CUCs each and it was bloody yum!

Paladar

Paladar

For something fancier, try Elite in the suburb of Miramar. We dined in an odd spot which felt like a carport but the food and service were great.

Elite Havana

Elite Havana

NEED TO KNOW

  • Don’t be afraid to stay out of the tourist zone. You’ll get a better view of Havana and also more bang for your buck.
  • Don’t expect your cards to work in the ATMs, take enough Mexican pesos with you to last the trip and exchange them when you arrive. But don’t exchange it all at once.
  • There are some scammers around, trying to sell you fake cigars, drugs and even sexy shows. Don’t fall for it, they’ll most likely take your money and leave you with nothing.
  • Havana’s a very safe place so enjoy yourself!

 

Share

Where to get a decent coffee in Mexico City

Best coffee in Mexico City

When I first moved to Mexico City in January 2014 there was pretty much only one or two places that did a decent coffee. Now I understand that everyone’s idea of a good coffee is different, but for the sake of this article, I’m talking about Australian standards. Us Aussies (particularly the southerners) are coffee snobs… we kinda have no choice, a good coffee is a part of our everyday life and is available on every street. There’s a reason why Starbucks never survived in Melbourne.

So for the travelling coffee lovers out there, here’s my list of great coffee spots in Mexico City (in no particular order):

Buna.mx
These guys started out roasting coffee on a rooftop and selling to cafes and restaurants. They then proceeded to open three cafes where they brew their own beans any way you want it:

El Tercer Lugar | Havre 83, Col. Juarez
Located in the trendy street of Havre in Juarez and close to Reforma, El Tercer Lugar is a cute little spot to enjoy a brew or two. They offer a wide range of brew methods and each coffee comes with a cute little cookie.

#caférico ? ? 〰

A photo posted by BUNA (@bunamx) on

Espresso | Queretaro 225 Col. Roma , Mercado Roma
Part of the cool food complex that is Mercado Roma, Espresso is a simple takeaway spot pumping out espresso coffees.

E S P R E S S O @mercadoroma #caférico

A photo posted by BUNA (@bunamx) on

Buna 44 | Orizaba 42, Col. Roma
Funky chic and scientific in design, Buna 44 takes specialty coffee to the next level. They have a modbar installed which makes everything look clean and spaceship like and they also weigh each shot. They offer pour-overs, filter, chemex and any other brew you desire. They’ve also renovated the space next door to make a kitchen and are serving tasty breakfasts and lunches. This place is set up well for working, with a shared bench space that has powerpoints for charging devices.

La perspectiva barista ?

A photo posted by BUNA (@bunamx) on

Cucurucho
Another top roaster, Cucurucho have locations in Cuauhtémoc, Roma and Condesa. They are simple takeaway joints offering espressos, cold brew and pour overs. They also offer ready made sandwiches, salads & cakes.
Rio Nazas#52-A, Col. Cuauhtémoc | Benjamín Hill 92, Hip. Condesa | Tonala 183, Col. Roma

Dosis Cafe | Alvaro Obregon 24, Col. Roma
A personal favourite of mine, Dosis is beautiful space with a nice industrial design. They offer espresso, drip, cold brew and filter as well as tasty bagels with cream cheese and pastries from the amazing Rosetta Bakery. Also another great spot to work.

Dosis Cafe

Chiquitito
As the name suggests this place is a small spot to enjoy a nice coffee and a bite to eat. They offer espresso, chemex, french press, pour over and aeropress as well as small bites like avocado on toast, molletes, sandwiches and pastries. They’re located in two locations – Condesa and Cuauhtémoc – with Cuauhtémoc being the larger of the two.
Alfonso Reyes 232E, Hip. Condesa | Rio Lerma 179, Cuauhtémoc

Chiquitito

Share
Pages:12»